welcometoitalia:

Villa Sticchi in Santa Cesarea Terme, Lecce, Puglia was built in the late 1890’s and is one of the most famous expressions of the Moresque style, which was widespread in the 19th Century in the affluent seaside resorts of the Salento. It was built at the behest of Giovanni Pasca, the first concessionaire of the Santa Cesarea thermal baths, between 1894 and 1900. The work was entrusted to Pasquale Ruggieri (1866-1924) who had a passion for the east and had made various trips to Egypt. 

welcometoitalia:

Villa Sticchi in Santa Cesarea Terme, Lecce, Puglia was built in the late 1890’s and is one of the most famous expressions of the Moresque style, which was widespread in the 19th Century in the affluent seaside resorts of the Salento. It was built at the behest of Giovanni Pasca, the first concessionaire of the Santa Cesarea thermal baths, between 1894 and 1900. The work was entrusted to Pasquale Ruggieri (1866-1924) who had a passion for the east and had made various trips to Egypt. 

italiansreclaimingitaly:

A really nice article about common words you will hear in Italy but won’t learn on textbooks. Italian slang is wide and varied, depending on city, region, even the person you’re talking to. It’s interesting to know more about these expressions because some don’t have an English parallel, others may even sound offending if you don’t know their meaning in the source language (check the comments in the article!) and they’re generally very fun to use.

I only have one thing to comment about (besides pointing out that “Fa cagare!” is more used than “Mi fa cagare!” because we like to cut words whenever we can), and it’s entry #10. It’s only used in Florence, so you won’t hear it anywhere else and if you use it, say, in Milan, people won’t understand you. I would have rather left that spot for the universal “Boh” (“bones”), which you will hear very, very often. There is no translation, but I can tell you it’s used to express doubt and uncertainty. Basically “I don’t know” or “I have no idea”, but shorter and more effective: “Are you hungry?” “Boh!” (I’m not sure, I can’t tell), or “When’s the next bus gonna be here?” “Boh!” (I have no idea and why would I even know that?). Tone is very important to deliver a good “Boh”. It sounds like you’re asking a question, but not really.

Have any of you heard of some Italian expressions you didn’t understand during your travels? Or maybe in a movie, or on the Internet. You have some slang expressions from your own language you want to check for an Italian parallel? Ask away!

welcometoitalia:

Otranto is a town and comune in the province of Lecce in Puglia, in a fertile region once famous for its breed of horses. It is located on the east coast of the Salento peninsula. The Strait of Otranto connects the Adriatic Sea with the Ionian Sea and separates Italy from Albania. The harbor is small and has little trade. The lighthouse Faro della Palascìa 5 km southeast marks the most easterly point of the Italian mainland. 50 km south lies the promontory of Santa Maria di Leuca (so called since ancient times from its white cliffs, leukos being Greek for white), the southeastern extremity of Italy, the ancient Promontorium lapygium or Sallentinum. The district between this promontory and Otranto is thickly populated and very fertile. It occupies the site of the ancient Hydrus (Greek: Ὑδροῦς) or Hydruntum (Latin), also known as Hydrunton, Hydronton, or Hydruntu. Otranto was a town of Greek origin, which, in the wars of Pyrrhus and of Hannibal sided against Rome.

welcometoitalia:

Otranto is a town and comune in the province of Lecce in Puglia, in a fertile region once famous for its breed of horses. It is located on the east coast of the Salento peninsula. The Strait of Otranto connects the Adriatic Sea with the Ionian Sea and separates Italy from Albania. The harbor is small and has little trade. The lighthouse Faro della Palascìa 5 km southeast marks the most easterly point of the Italian mainland. 50 km south lies the promontory of Santa Maria di Leuca (so called since ancient times from its white cliffs, leukos being Greek for white), the southeastern extremity of Italy, the ancient Promontorium lapygium or Sallentinum. The district between this promontory and Otranto is thickly populated and very fertile. It occupies the site of the ancient Hydrus (Greek: Ὑδροῦς) or Hydruntum (Latin), also known as Hydrunton, Hydronton, or Hydruntu. Otranto was a town of Greek origin, which, in the wars of Pyrrhus and of Hannibal sided against Rome.